Wozniacki tight-lipped on retirement as she basks in semi-final berth

Updated: 

Caroline Wozniacki refused to discuss questions about her possible retirement from tennis after reaching the semi-finals of the US Open on Tuesday.

Wozniacki - a two-time runner-up at Flushing Meadows - powered into the final four with a crushing 6-0 6-2 win over injured opponent Anastasija Sevastova.

The 26-year-old former world number one's quarter-final triumph came in the wake of comments from her father, claiming retirements could be on the cards.

But Wozniacki was tight-lipped regarding her future as she looks ahead to a semi-final showdown with Australian Open champion and Olympic Games silver medallist Angelique Kerber in New York.

"I think I don't want to really talk about that now," Wozniacki told reporters after being quizzed about her dad's comments. "When I feel ready to open up and say something then I will, but for now I'm just here to play this tournament.

"Hopefully I have two more matches here. It's really all I'm focused on right now."

Instead, she is not looking too far ahead, staying in the moment and basking in the spotlight of being back among the best at grand slams, having struggled for form and consistency in the last couple of years.

"There is always going to be uphill battles, and sometimes it's not going to go your way," she added.

"But I always believe if you work hard and you have the belief, and obviously you give it your all, eventually it will turn. It's been a great week or ten days for me. I'm really pleased.

"I think the fact that I have friends and family here and I can just go home and relax and kind of unwind, it's really helped me to kind of just enjoy it and not look ahead and not stress and just show up. I'm like, Well, I get another day; I get another chance. It's great."

The straight-sets win at Arthur Ashe Stadium ended the fairytale run of Latvian Sevastova, who was hampered by a right ankle injury throughout.

"It was affecting my play, but I'm not a person that likes to retire during a match, so I just tried my best," she said. "But the movement was different. It was harder to move. And also on serve it was harder to get out of the serve."