Hansen proud of All Blacks focus amid 'bugging' controversy


New Zealand coach Steve Hansen was proud of his team for maintaining concentration in their Rugby Championship encounter with Australia after a "listening device" was found in their Sydney hotel meeting room ahead of kick-off.

The New Zealand Rugby Union confirmed on Saturday that a device had been found, with reports suggesting it had been concealed within a chair.

Despite the pre-match controversy, the All Blacks ran out 42-8 winners at ANZ Stadium for their biggest triumph on Australian soil.

Hansen was pleased with their focus and is keen to move on from the issue.

"It's not something that we wanted, but it happened. It's like an injury, isn't it. You've got to deal with it and it's not in your control," said Hansen.

"But how you react is in your control and we've just got on with our work and passed it over to the powers that be and they'll deal with it."

The All Blacks coach was unwilling to speculate about who placed the device in the room and will instead await results of an investigation by Australian police.

"Lots of people are speculating about who's done it and who hasn't and I don't think that's fair because no one knows who's done it and obviously there's plenty of people who could do it," said Hansen.

"So I think until the enquiry's done by the police, we should sit back and that's it, let them do their job and certainly not speculate on who planted it there because no one knows. We certainly don't know."

Wallabies coach Michael Cheika denied any involvement on behalf of his team, adding there would be little to gain from listening in.

"I don't think anyone accused us of putting it there, did they? It's got nothing to do with us," Cheika said.

"I'm not that paranoid about it. Whatever happens, happens. It's not ever been an issue or something I've worried about if someone's doing it to us.

"You can hear audio from teams on television, lineout calls, but you've still got to stop them. I'm not that big on the whole thing, I don't think it's that big a deal."