Burnley's Dyche claims foreign favouritism


Sean Dyche believes English managers in the Premier League are unfairly criticised for their methods, claiming he would be branded a "dinosaur" if he employed the same tactics as his foreign counterparts.

The Burnley manager was eager to point out he had no problem with foreign managers in the Premier League, but believes an undue disconnect in opinion from the footballing public exists.

Dyche said that while foreign managers are labelled as innovators, English bosses in comparison can be criticised for a similar approach.

"There is a thirst for foreign coaches who are always tactical geniuses. There is still a thirst from the populous for foreign managers and foreign players. They're a bit more snazzy - let's see what this Belgian manager or this Argentine manager can do," he said.

"Antonio Conte came in at Chelsea and he got commended for bringing a hard, fast, new leadership to Chelsea which involved doing 800 metre runs, 400m runs and 200m runs.

"Come to my training and see Sean Dyche do that and you'd say, 'Dinosaur, a young English dinosaur manager, hasn't got a clue.' So is it perception or is it fact? I have no problem with it. It's the reality I say. Perception is radically different to what's going on with young English managers."

Dyche, whose Burnley will mark their return to the Premier League on Saturday when they host Swansea City, also noted Leicester City's run to the title last season as an example.

"They questioned me for playing 4-4-2 and then everyone played it last year and it was, 'amazing Ranieri, tactical genius'," he said.

"Klopp came in [at Liverpool] and played a sort of 4-4-2 and let's run really hard and press, people thought it was incredible. Wasn't Sean Dyche doing that three years ago when he got here?

"Why do you buy a branded pair of jeans rather than the other pair? Because you think they're better, but they might not be. I think there's a bit of that, sometimes it's just a bigger name is a bigger name."

Dyche's comments come after newly-appointed England manager Sam Allardyce called for the Football Association (FA) to introduce a version of the NFL's Rooney Rule in December, ensuring a British coach is interviewed for every British coaching position.