World Twenty20 Final: Key battles

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The sixth World Twenty20 final takes place at Kolkata's Eden Gardens on Sunday, with England and West Indies each seeking to become the first two-time winners of the tournament.

England are looking to follow up their success in the Caribbean six years ago, while the Windies have the opportunity to add to their victory in Sri Lanka in 2012.

We look at the battles that are likely to shape this year's final - a rematch of the opening Super 10 match between the sides that the Windies won.



JASON ROY v SAMUEL BADREE

Badree has been in fine form and his impact early in the England innings could be crucial. The spinner has seven wickets at an average of 15.42, but his economy (5.68) makes him vital. He is the number-one ranked T20 bowler in the world and is likely to come up against the in-form Roy, who made a 44-ball 78 against New Zealand in England's semi-final win.

DAVID WILLEY v CHRIS GAYLE

West Indies opener Gayle has delivered little since his unbeaten century against England in their opening game. A hamstring injury for the left-hander has been followed by respective scores of four and five against South Africa and India, but his T20 record is a fearsome one and he remains the Windies' biggest threat with the bat. Willey has delivered for England with the new ball, taking seven wickets - and could set his team up by removing Gayle early.

BEN STOKES v DWAYNE BRAVO

Stokes and Bravo have been producing mostly with the ball during the tournament, the former combining with Chris Jordan to limit New Zealand to just 20 runs in the last four overs of the Black Caps' semi-final innings. Fellow all-rounder Bravo has six wickets at 25.5 and a respectable economy rate of 7.65, thanks largely to his many variations. Both men are capable of match-winning contributions with bat, ball and in the field.

JOS BUTTLER v ANDRE RUSSELL

Big-hitters Buttler and Russell will be looked upon to take the game away from their opposition when batting - and quickly. Buttler, a scorer of runs all around the wicket, has frequently been pushed up the order by England when a platform is in place and averages 51.66 in the tournament at a strike-rate of 158. Russell, who will also hope to make an impression with the ball, comes into the final having blasted a career-best 43 not out from just 20 balls in the Windies' last-four win over India.