World Cup stadium projects on the right track - FIFA


FIFA has claimed it is "on the right track" in the protection of workers' rights at World Cup stadium projects following a damning report by Amnesty International on the treatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

Amnesty accused FIFA and the Qatari authorities of indifference towards systematic abuse and "appalling treatment" of migrants working on stadiums that will host the 2022 World Cup, following interviews with 132 contractors and 102 landscapers working on the tournament facilities.

The report described the abuse of migrant workers as "a stain on the conscience of world football", but FIFA has claimed the "unique attraction" of the World Cup will act as a catalyst for a change in working conditions in Qatar.

In a statement, FIFA claimed to have been working with key stakeholders, including Amnesty International, since 2011 to discuss the best way to achieve fair working conditions on World Cup construction sites.

The statement pointed to the structures put in place by Qatar's Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, which include the Worker's Welfare Standards implemented in 2014 and regular, publicly available reporting, as evidence that the World Cup project is making progress in the right direction.

Federico Addiechi, head of sustainability at FIFA, said: "We are fully aware of the risks facing construction workers in Qatar and we are confident that the measures taken by the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy are the appropriate ones and have already improved the situation for migrant workers working on FIFA World Cup construction sites.

"We closely monitor developments and address issues through our regular contact with the Supreme Committee. We have also met with a number of key stakeholders to discuss the best way forward.

"Of course many challenges remain, but we are on the right track and committed to continue improving, to further contribute to the protection of workers' rights at the FIFA World Cup stadium projects."