Australian Open: Stopping Serena proving impossible


The pure dominance with which Serena Williams has reached the Australian Open final is frightening.

Only Angelique Kerber stands between the world number one American and a 22nd grand slam title, and good luck to the German.

Williams is, incredibly, yet to drop a set - and add to that the fact she has lost just 26 games at Melbourne Park this year.

A win in the women's final on Saturday and Williams will join German Steffi Graf on 22 grand slam titles, second only to Margaret Court (24) all-time.

Williams appears almost certain to at least join Court atop the list, if not exceed her and then some.

The 34-year-old's power is still too much to handle for all on tour, as she showed in a 6-0 6-4 win over Pole Agnieszka Radwanska in the semi-finals on Thursday.

If she can sweep aside Kerber in straight sets in the decider, it will mark the first time Williams has won the year's first grand slam without losing a set.

She is unlikely to set a new personal best when it comes to games lost in one of her crowns, with the number having risen to 26 - almost as many as the 29 dropped at the 2002 and 2013 US Opens.

Of her 21 previous majors, five have been won without dropping a set - and her longevity has been remarkable.

From Wimbledon and Flushing Meadows in 2002, to the US Open in 2008, the All England Club in 2010 and the United States again in 2014.

At the 2016 Australian Open, 40 per cent of her serves have gone unreturned and she has won 83 per cent of first serve points.

Just how - and who - can compete with that remains a huge question mark heading into the remainder of the season.

However, as Radwanska put it after her defeat, which included being steamrolled in 20 minutes in the first set, when Williams is at her best, there is a huge gap.

"If she's playing her best tennis like she was playing today in the first set, it's a big difference actually. I don't think anyone can really play on that level," she said.

"She really showed her great tennis at all the grand slams. She is really showing she wants to win it. She's doing everything right.

"She goes on court and she just wants to kill it. Going like full power for everything. So I don't think anyone can really play on that kind of level at all."

A look at the top 10 in the WTA rankings brings up very little threat, although Victoria Azarenka's return there - and to her top form - may change that ever so slightly.

But, for now, still, Williams will take some stopping.