Yes, US astronauts can vote from space. And here's how it works...

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Getting out to vote seems like a necessary evil - it's just a bit of an effort to make your way down to the polling stations, right? Well, no one feels this more than astronaut Shane Kimbrough who is casting his vote from the International Space Station.

Luckily, not being on the planet hasn't stopped Kimbrough from having his say in this historic election - although the actual voting process was a bit of a palaver.

The American astronaut has already voted, and a Nasa spokesman has explained how. "It is through an electronic and secure ballot that is uplinked to the crewmember through our means from the local county clerk's office," he told FoxNews.com.

Shane Kimbrough
(Maxim Shipenkov/AP)

"The crewmember fills out the ballot and returns it electronically. All secure. All private."

The move is in keeping with Nasa's motto of "vote while you float". Nasa said the previous US space station resident, Kate Rubins, also cast an absentee ballot from up there, before returning to Earth a week ago.

A 1997 Texas law allows US astronauts to vote from space. For Nasa astronauts, home is Houston when they are not circling the globe.