Jeremy Corbyn calls for 'magic circle' to be broken in a plea for popular politics


Jeremy Corbyn has called for the "magic circle" of Westminster to be broken and the views of "ordinary people" to be heard, as he addressed thousands of Labour supporters at the final leadership rally before the ballot papers go out.

The party leader said he would encourage "decision-making for the millions not the millionaires" as he spoke at the event in Ruach City Church in Kilburn, north London.

Organisers said more than 3,000 supporters had turned out for the event, which was billed as the biggest London rally in the campaign to date.

Jeremy Corbyn

Corbyn received a rapturous welcome from the crowd, with many rising to their feet and chanting his name as he walked on stage.

He was met with cheers as he said workers "in factories, in call centres, in local authorities" had ideas about how to change the economy, but were "frustrated that nobody is listening to them".

"The principle of democracy has to be ground up," he said, as he urged supporters to vote to re-elect him as Labour leader.

"It is about breaking open this magical circle of Westminster, some of our great universities, Whitehall and the boardrooms who try to control thinking, control ideas and control the way policy is developed."

Jeremy Corbyn supporters

Boos echoed around the venue when Claudia Webbe, a member of Labour's National Executive Committee, mentioned London mayor Sadiq Khan in her speech.

Khan has urged Labour Party members to ditch their leader and back his rival Owen Smith instead saying Corbyn had failed to win the trust of voters and that Labour was "extremely unlikely" to secure a return to power as long as he remained leader.

Jeremy Corbyn supporter

But Webbe said: "Despite what Sadiq Khan says, we want London under Jeremy Corbyn's leadership and to improve unity and support for Labour Party members who campaign on the doorsteps."

She added: "Sadiq's victory was a victory for the politics of unity and against the politics of division and disunity and hate."