Police think these convicted killers might be behind another murder


Two notorious killers have been named by police as prime suspects in an unsolved murder case dating back more than 20 years.

Kenneth Regan and William Horncy, who are serving whole life sentences for the murder of the Chohan family in 2003, are believed to be responsible for the death of 53-year-old Michael Schallamach, from Southampton, who disappeared in April 1992.

Michael Schallamach

A Hampshire Police spokesman said: "Armajit Chohan was murdered by Regan and Horncy to steal his freight business so they could use it as a front for drug running.

"They also murdered Armarjit's 25-year-old wife Nancy and their two young sons, 18-month-old Devinder and two-month-old Ravinder along with Nancy's 51-year-old mother Charanjit Kaur.

"Hampshire Constabulary's Major Investigation Team now believe that Regan and Horncy murdered Michael Schallamach 10 years before they murdered the Chohan family."

Metropolitan Police undated collect photos of Kenneth Regan and William Horncy who have been named by Hampshire Police as prime suspects in the unsolved murder case of Michael Schallamach dating back more than 20 years.

The spokesman said that following a second review of the evidence they believed that the two suspects were "directly involved" in Mr Schallamach's murder.

He said: "At the time of Mr Schallamach's disappearance the police and his family were told by his associates that he had run away with another woman to live in Europe or Nigeria.

"His wife Yvonne even received a handwritten letter sent from France from a person, allegedly called Helen, stating they had run off together."

(Hampshire Police/PA)

Officers will be appearing on the BBC 1 TV programme Crimewatch Roadshow on Thursday in a bid to identify the letter writer as well as appeal to anyone with information about what happened to Mr Schallamach.

Detective Chief Superintendent Ben Snuggs said: "Did you write the letter? Do you know who did? Do you recognise this person's handwriting? If so I would ask you to come forward and tell my officers what you know.

"You may know what happened to Michael Schallamach. It has been 24 year since he went missing. Friendships and allegiances change over the years. This may be the last opportunity to tell what you know to the police."