Brexit vote aftermath: the 5 key developments so far today


The UK and Europe are still digesting the result of the EU referendum and hearing reaction from around the world.

Here are the latest developments as the political fallout of the win for Leave unfolds.

1. Scotland edges towards 'IndyRef2´

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon speaks to the media outside Bute House, Edinburgh, following an emergency Scottish cabinet meeting

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said her government will seek to enter into "immediate discussions" with Brussels to "protect Scotland's place in the EU" in the wake of the Brexit vote.

Sturgeon said she will establish an advisory panel with experts to advise her on legal, financial and diplomatic matters as she seeks to continue Scotland's membership.

Speaking after an emergency Scottish cabinet meeting, Sturgeon also said her ministers had agreed to begin work on legislation that would allow for the option of a second independence referendum.

2. Corbyn pledges to fight for Labour leadership

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn arrives for a speech on immigration and Brexit at the Maxwell Library, Savoy Place in London

Embattled Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has pledged to fight for his job if MPs attempt to topple him.

Facing a vote of no confidence next week, Corbyn insisted he would run again if forced into a crisis leadership election which would be decided by grassroots members.

Corbyn said "there are some people in the Parliamentary Labour Party who would probably want somebody else being the leader of this party" but that he has been amazed at the show of support by people calling for him to stay.

3. Europe adds more pressure for quick Brexit

The Foreign Ministers from EU's founding six member nations in Berlin

European nations have piled pressure on the UK to begin immediate talks on withdrawal from the EU.

Speaking after a meeting in Berlin with foreign ministers of the other five founding members of the EU, German foreign minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier says negotiations should begin "as soon as possible".

French foreign minister Jean-Marc Ayrault echoed that, saying "there is a certain urgency... so that we don't have a period of uncertainty, with financial consequences, political consequences".

French president Francois Hollande, speaking after a meeting in Paris with UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon, said: "For the entire planet there is a question, what will happen?"

4. UK's commissioner quits job in Brussels

The UK's European Commissioner Lord Hill of Oareford has announced he will stand down from his post as commissioner for financial stability.

Hill will continue his work over the coming weeks to allow for an "orderly handover" of his responsibilities but said: "As we move to a new phase, I don't believe it is right that I should carry on as the British Commissioner as though nothing had happened."

It was not immediately clear whether he will be replaced on the commission, which contains one member from each of the union's 28 member states but commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said he was ready for "swift" discussions with Prime Minister David Cameron on a replacement.

5. Second referendum

Screen grab taken from the Government petition website of a petition calling for a new EU referendum

More than one million people have signed an online petition calling for a new EU referendum.

The milestone was reached at about 10.45am on Saturday, just over 24 hours after official confirmation Britain had voted to leave the EU following the historic vote.

The petition, set up by William Oliver Healey, states: "We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the Remain or Leave vote is less than 60% based on a turnout less than 75%, there should be another referendum."