Cameron says intolerance and hatred should be kept out of EU debate, in wake of Jo Cox's death


Politicians should respond to the death of Labour MP Jo Cox by ensuring they keep intolerance and hatred out of the EU referendum debate, Prime Minister David Cameron has said.

Cameron said it was too early to say what the motivation was behind the violent attack on Cox outside her constituency surgery on Thursday.

But he said that the lesson for politicians was that they should promote the principles of tolerance and community that she lived her life by.

An image and floral tributes for Jo Cox, lay on Parliament Square, outside the House of Parliament in London, Friday, June 17, 2016, after the 41-year-old British Member of Parliament was fatally injured Thursday in northern England. The mother of two young children was shot to death Thursday afternoon in her constituency near Leeds.

Speaking on BBC One's Question Time referendum special in Milton Keynes, Cameron said: "Let me say how shocked I think the whole country has been by this appalling murder. Two children have lost their mother,a loving husband has lost his wife, and my heart breaks when I think of them and what they are going through.

"I think the most important thing for the politicians is to remember what she was all about, which was service, community, tolerance. These are values we should all try to live by and promote, in order to remember her.

"I don't think we know why exactly this happened or what the motivation was and we have to wait for the police investigation before we do that.

A floral tribute left by Prime Minister David Cameron in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.

"But I think what we do know is wherever we see intolerance, hatred, division, we should try and drive it out of our communities,out of our public life.

"We have to be careful that debates can be passionate but we have to make sure that they are not based on those things."