Founders of BrewDog toast their 'incredible' MBEs


The co-founders of craft beer company BrewDog have said their MBEs are "incredible" recognition of how much they have achieved in nine years.

James Watt and Martin Dickie set up BrewDog in 2007 when they were 24 in response to the "stuffy ales" which dominated the UK drinks market.

Aberdeenshire-based BrewDog has grown from two employees to 580 and opened around 30 bars across the UK and 15 more around the world including Helsinki, Tokyo, Rome and Sao Paulo.


Last year, the company's sales grew by more than 50% to £45 million and the company now exports to more than 50 countries.

It has also established the BrewDog Development Fund, allocating up to £100,000 of its annual profits to helping other craft breweries get established.

Watt said of their MBEs: "It's amazing to have been awarded something so prestigious - it's incredible to have the craft beer industry recognised at this level.

"It shows just how far we have come in our nine short years.

"We're building an incredible team of passionate, beer-loving people both at home and internationally, with all of us on a mission to make other people as passionate about great craft beer as we are."

BrewDog has attracted controversy over the years, producing what was the world's strongest beer in 2010 at 55% alcohol-by-volume, naming a beer Speedball after the heroin-and-cocaine cocktail that killed River Phoenix and, for the 2011 royal wedding releasing a beer containing so-called natural aphrodisiacs which it called Royal Virility Performance.

It was also branded "irresponsible" by health campaigners after it launched what it claimed was Britain's strongest beer, named Tokyo, with an 18.2% alcohol content.

It responded to the outcry by unveiling an ale with a 1.1% alcohol content - named Nanny State.

Its original Punk IPA remains one of the best-selling craft beers in the UK and BrewDog was recently named the UK's fastest-growing food and drink company by the Sunday Times Fast Track 100.