Murder police arrest man after human remains found in search for missing Pc


Detectives hunting for a missing police officer have arrested a man on suspicion of murder after human remains were found.

Pc Gordon Semple, 59, left his home in Greenhithe, Dartford, to go to work in Westminster on Friday April 1, and on that same day visited the Shard - but he has not been seen since that afternoon.

Scotland Yard said detectives searching for the officer have begun a forensic search of a property in Southwark, south east London.

A 49-year-old man was arrested there on suspicion of murder and is in police custody.

The Metropolitan Police described it as a "significant development", and said they have informed Mr Semple's family.

In a statement, the force added: "We are unable to make formal identification at this stage, but this is devastating news for all those involved in the search for Gordon.

"His family are being supported by specially trained officers and his colleagues have been briefed."

Police were called at 1.07pm on Thursday to an address on the Peabody Estate, Southwark Street, where human remains were discovered.

The Met said: "Our work at that scene is crucial to ensure we capture all available evidence and this may take some time.

"At this stage we will not speculate any further on what may have happened or possible motive."

A post-mortem will be held in due course, and until that has taken place the police said they will not speculate on the cause of death.

The Met officer's partner reported him missing after he failed to return home from work and the last known sighting of him was at 3pm on Friday when he was seen on CCTV on Great Guildford Street near London Bridge.

He had been at the Shard earlier in the day, leaving at about 12.30pm, and detectives wanted to find out where he went between that time and the last time he featured on CCTV around two-and-a-half hours later.

Scotland Yard had said the investigation to find Mr Semple was being treated as a high-risk missing person's inquiry, but due to concerns for his welfare, the Homicide and Major Crime Command began leading the efforts to find him.