Motorbike and scooter deaths rise in London


The number of deaths and series injuries from motorcycle and scooter accidents in London has risen.

There were 36 deaths in 2015 up from 27 in the previous year, according to the Transport for London figures. There were were also 514 serious injuries in the year up to September 2015, compared with 507 the previous year, according to provisional data.

The figures, along with a pledge that more officers will be posted at key motorcycle hotspot junctions where collisions are most likely to occur, came as another rider was killed in a road accident. He died after coming off his bike in Battersea Park Road, Battersea, south London.

Police have stopped 5,389 riders, issued 742 traffic offence reports, 1,335 verbal warnings, seized 96 motorcycles and made 10 arrests since September in its drive to cut the number of deaths and injuries.

This has involved deploying officers at hotspot locations and at key times across London.

Police are to target the boroughs where motorcyclists are at greatest risk of injury.

London mayor Boris Johnson said:  "We need every single motorcyclist to feel safe on our streets and this work is key to that goal."

TfL has published a guide - the Urban Motorcycle Design Handbook - to aid safer road design for motorcycle and scooter riders. They have also found backing for Motorcycle Industry Association accredited motorcycle training centres across London to try to improve rider skills and confidence.

Leon Daniels, TfL's managing director of surface transport, said: "We are fully committed to making London's roads safer for all, and with this focus on motorcycle and scooter safety, bringing down the number of collisions involving this vulnerable road user group.

"The three Es - enforcement, education and engineering - are central to this. On-street education and enforcement, substantial investment in improving rider skills and guidance to help engineers design roads so that they are safer for riders, all form part of a concerted effort to improve road safety in the capital."