Son of 'fifth Beatle' George Martin open to Paul and Ringo collaboration


The son of the late Beatles producer Sir George Martin has said he is open to working on new music with the band's surviving members.

Giles Martin joined Sir Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr in Las Vegas to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Cirque Du Soleil show based on the Fab Four's music.

Giles Martin with father Sir George Martin in 2006 (Jae C Hong/AP/PA)

John Lennon's widow Yoko Ono and their son Sean Lennon were also guests at the Mirage hotel, while George Harrison's widow Olivia was expected to attend.

Giles, the musical director of The Beatles Love by Cirque Du Soleil, said he would consider working with Sir Paul and Starr if they decided to reunite but "it wouldn't be The Beatles".

He told the Press Association: "I think the reason you ask that is because 'would it be like The Beatles?' And no, it wouldn't be. The Beatles were four of them.

"I love them both and they're hugely kind to me."

Sir Paul McCartney

He said: "What can I say, it wouldn't be The Beatles," before adding: "I mean I'm open to anything."

Sir George, often described as "The Fifth Beatle", died in March aged 90 and his son produced a number of tracks on Sir Paul's 2013 album New.

Film-maker Ron Howard also attended the Cirque Du Soleil show after directing a new documentary, The Beatles: Eight Days A Week - The Touring Years, which is due for release in September.

Ron Howard praised the Beatles for their early stand against segregation in the US (Joel Ryan/AP/PA)

Speaking on the red carpet, he said he had learnt that the Beatles voiced concerns about segregation in America at the height of their fame.

Ron told the Press Association: "I didn't know they had taken an important stand on segregation in the South. I knew that later they began to speak out against the war in Vietnam and become involved in that and other social issues.

"I didn't know that early in their career they were actually taking very hard, very courageous positions with something as incendiary in the United States as segregation. It was amazing to learn about that."